NEWS + ANNOUNCEMENTS

Professor Anna Taddio and a team of pediatricians and researchers from the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, and York University published a paper in CMAJ comparing the effectiveness of pain interventions administered during vaccine injections during the first year of life.

The Canada Research Chairs Program announced the appointment of three new Canada Research Chairs at the University of Toronto’s Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy today.

This morning, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced the appointments of the newest group of Canada Research Chairs while visiting the University of Toronto. The University of Toronto received 25 of these chairs, with the Faculty leading the way with three new chairs for assistant professors...

Graduate student Joy Yang from Professor K. Sandy Pang’s laboratory was the recent recipient of an American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists award, and represented the Faculty at the association’s Annual Meeting and Exposition in Denver, Colorado.

Joy’s poster, “PBPK-PD to Examine 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3, Concentrations and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Targets,” received the Travel Award from the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics,...

Cancerous tumours are known to release cells into the bloodstream, and it is these circulating tumour cells or CTCs that are the sources of metastatic tumours – tumours that spread and form in distant locations in the body.  In fact, most patients who succumb to cancer do not die because of the initial tumours that form, but rather because of the deadly secondary metastatic tumours that appear at distant sites.  As a result, understanding the biology and clinical relevance of...

Researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a process that dramatically cuts the amount of time it takes to create new cancer treatments. Using a new breakthrough technology, their study, published today in Nature Medicine, identified a new potential target for the treatment of a class of pancreatic cancer, and unveiled a new treatment option that exploits genetic faults to destroy cancer cells.

Patients are often at their most vulnerable during transitions in care. Unfortunately, it is precisely during these times – when patients are admitted to hospital or discharged from hospital to their own homes – when medication discrepancies, drug therapy problems, and adverse events can occur. In Canada, 40-50% of patients admitted to hospitals experience unintentional medication discrepancies, while at least 40% of patients experience unintentional discrepancies upon discharge...

Medication reconciliation is an important process where healthcare providers work together with patients, families, and other care providers to ensure that accurate and comprehensive medication information is communicated consistently over transitions in care.

A recent study published in The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry revealed that children in Canada are now being prescribed more psychotropic medications – specifically antidepressants and antipsychotics – than ever before. At the same time, members of the healthcare community are looking more closely at the risk-benefit profile of these medications in the pediatric population, and whether or not these medications are effective in treating the issues they are being prescribed to...